Help for low-income writers – in 1,000 words or less
K. M. Elkes

Ken reading at the launch of Flash Fiction Festival One.

Though I may not have as many hats as Bartholomew Cubbins (apologies if you are confused by the Dr Seuss reference here), I’m wearing a fair few for this year’s Flash Fiction Festival.

In the run-up to the festival I’m trying to get media coverage of the event (so if you’re reading this and maybe have a show on Radio 4 or write a literary column for the Guardian, then feel free to get in touch!).

During the Festival I will be popping up as Editor of The A3 Review – a short poetry and prose magazine that folds like a map – which I co-edit alongside Writing Maps publishers Shaun Levin. We’re aiming to provide all festival-goers with a selection of back issues absolutely free.
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Christopher Allen has Something to Say

I’m getting pumped about the UK’s second annual flash fiction festival, and it’s only March. Last year was inspiring, and I’m sure this year will serve up more of the same.

This year is particularly exciting for me. I’ve just published a collection of flash: Other Household Toxins (Matter Press), an eclectic grouping of 48 stories from the last 10 years that I hope shows the breadth of what’s possible with flash. I’ll be reading from the collection and also signing books at the flash fiction festival in July.

I’ll also be leading the workshop “Do You Have Something to Say?” because I think this is one of the most important topics we can discuss these days as writers of flash. In my opinion, our best stories reveal something about our nature and purpose while challenging us to see these often tragic subjects from fresh angles. I’ve made a commitment to myself starting in 2018 to write only stories that rip me apart—even if this means I write only a few. At the workshop in July, we’ll be talking about how difficult it is to write stories like this and how to avoid their pitfalls.
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A Flash Guide to V. Press with Sarah Leavesley

In summer 2018, V. Press celebrates its fifth birthday. It’s a very, very delightful coincidence that it also marks the publication of our fifth fiction title!

The press was originally set up and launched at Ledbury Poetry Festival in 2013. But it only really got going in 2015, with three poetry pamphlets. In 2016, V. Press published three poetry pamphlets, a poetry collection and our first flash pamphlet. This increased to nine titles in 2017, with a similar schedule for 2018.
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Flash Fiction Festival 2017 in Pictures

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